Short and Sweet:

Tips for living the abundant life

 
Another Coffee from the June 1999 Deep Cove Crier

'Pop Goes the Weasel'

Everyone nowadays loves the Sally Ann, the Salvation Army.  But such admiration was not always universal.  Violence and bloodshed was the order of the day when William Booth first reached out to the down-and-out in East London.  Few people today realize that one of the main purposes of the famous Sally Ann Bonnet was to protect the heads of wearers from brickbats and other missiles.  So many people used to buy rotten eggs to throw at the Sally Ann Bonnets that these rancid eggs became renamed in the market place as 'Salvation Army eggs!'

In 1880,heavy sticks crashed upon the Salvation Army soldiers' heads, laying them open, and saturating them in blood.  Mrs. Bryan (wife of the Captain) was knocked down and kicked into insensibility not ten yards from the police station, and another sister so injured that she died within a week.  During 1882, it was reported that 669 soldiers and officers had been knocked down, kicked or otherwise brutally assaulted, 251 of them being women and 23 children under 15.  In Hamilton, Ontario, the Salvation Army officers were initially 'squeezed and mangled, scratched, their clothes torn and almost choked with the dust…'  In Quebec City, 21 soldiers were seriously injured, an officer was stabbed in the head with a knife, and the drummer had his eye gouged out. In Newfoundland, the Salvation Army was attacked with hatchets, knives, scissors and darning needles.  One night a woman-Salvationist in Newfoundland was attacked by a gang of three hundred ruffians, thrown into a ditch and trampled on.  She managed to crawl out only to be thrown in again, as other women were shouting 'Kill her! Kill her!

Ironically many police initially blamed the Salvation Army for being persecuted.  In numerous parts of England, playing in a Salvation Army Marching Band was punishable with a jail sentence!  During 1884, no fewer than 600 Salvationists had gone to prison in defense of their right to proclaim good news to the people in music and word.  In Canada alone, nearly 350 SA officers and soldiers served terms of imprisonment for spreading the gospel.  Despite the jail sentences and persecution, within three years the Army's strength more than quadrupled!  The early Salvation Army 'jailbirds described their handcuffs as heavenly bracelets.  It is little wonder that the Salvation Army eventually developed such a powerful prison ministry.

One of William Booth's mottoes was  'go for souls and go for the worst!'  A local English newspaper The Echo commented that the Salvation Army largely recruited the ranks of the drunkards and wife-beaters and woman home-destroyers.  Many of us remember as children the song: 'Up and down the City Road, In and Out the Eagle; That's the way the money goes, Pop goes the weasel'!   Few of us realized that we were singing about the famous Eagle Tavern, just off City Road in London.   'Pop goes the weasel' was cockney slang for the alcoholic who was so desperate for a drink that he would even pawn (pop) his watch (weasel).  Ironically, the Salvation Army bought the Eagle Tavern and turned it into a rehabilitation centre.  The Lion and Key public house in East London became known as 'The Army Recruiting Shop'.  The landlord said, 'My trade's suffering, but you're making the town a different place, so we can't grumble.  Go on and prosper!'

What is it about William Booth and the Salvation Army that they were initially so hated before becoming universally loved?  Click to find out more…

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St. Simon's Anglican Church 
North Vancouver, B.C.